Saturday, March 27, 2010

March Pinks

After reading the title of this post, you might look at this photograph and think, "Poor Ang, gone colorblind, she has." However, if you knew my Granddaddy, then you'd realize I'm talking about the flowers in the photograph.

Yep, Lee Duncan called daffodils "March Pinks," and I don't think it ever failed to get a reaction out of us kids. March pinks? Pinks? If he doesn't want to call them daffodils, fine, but can't he see that those flowers are yellow?

Now, I wonder where he heard that name. Now, I wish I could sit with him and pepper him with questions, from the minute ones (like Why do you call that flower by that name?) to the all encompassing ones (like What made you believe so whole-heartedly in doing things according to the signs of the moon?)

I know exactly what James and Kate would ask him, if they had been alive when he was. . . How bad did it hurt when you cut off your finger, and did you really "feel" it years after it was gone??

Our Granddaddy was a tall man, a tough man. In fact, he was so much taller than my cousins' other grandfather that they called their other grandfather "Little Granddaddy." Granddaddy had a grip like a vise, and you'd never have known he was missing a finger if you didn't look at his hand. He accidentally chopped that index finger off with an ax while splitting firewood. I think my mom was there when it happened, but I don't remember how old she was at the time. I just remember hearing the story and thinking two things: that must have been one heckuva sharp ax and how tough do you have to be to watch that happen to yourself and not go crazy?

I do love words and history and pop culture, so I realize that March Pinks might have been a common name for daffodils in the early 1900's. Still, I figure Lee Duncan might have made the explanation into a fairly entertaining story. Happy Springtime, Granddaddy!

2 comments:

Karolen said...

You are a great writer and story-teller. I enjoy reading your posts.
I found a couple of references to pink daffodils:
http://www.austinwildflower.com/plantopia/mrs_ro_backhouse_daffodil_1.html

http://www.paghat.com/narcissuspinkpride.html

angelinabeadalina said...

Thanks, Karolen!

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